Lead change in Veterans’ health care as a VAMC executive director

Ensure excellence in health care for our nation’s Veterans by leading one of 14 VA medical centers looking for an executive director


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VA is looking for ambitious trailblazers who can inspire and lead change in Veterans’ care. Want to be an executive director of VA medical centers (VAMCs)? Apply for open positions in 14 cities!

If you’re a licensed physician/dental officer or health system administrator ready to make a lasting impact on the care Veterans receive, apply for open positions in Amarillo and Big Spring, Texas; Chicago and Hines, Illinois; Honolulu, Hawaii; Indianapolis, Indiana; Leeds, Massachusetts; Manchester, New Hampshire; Montgomery, Alabama; Montrose and Syracuse, New York; Phoenix and Prescott, Arizona; and Providence, Rhode Island.

As a VA health executive, you shape the people, processes and policies that further VA’s commitment to providing high-quality care to those who’ve served the country. As a senior executive service (SES) VAMC executive director, you work at the facility level to direct the nature and scope of patient care delivery.

“Our VAMC executive directors have a direct impact on the nation’s largest integrated health care system,” said Darren Sherrard, associate director of Recruitment and Marketing at VA. “You ensure that your team works in an inclusive and supportive environment to support great outcomes for Veterans.”

You also set goals, make decisions and plan ahead. Your role involves developing relationships with other federal agencies, the media, local and state government, and community-based organizations.

Choose VA to shape care

You carry out key decisions that advance the quality of care that VA provides overall. You also influence the medical facility’s culture and service to the most diverse population of Veterans in history. Executive directors report to the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) Director for your region and are responsible for the financially sound direction and operation of your medical center.

VA leadership positions come with these and other benefits:

  • Competitive salary and premium-paid medical, vision and dental insurance.
  • Access to the Federal Employees’ Retirement System (FERS), a three-tier retirement plan that includes Social Security, a federal pension and a 401(k)-type plan with up to 5% in employer contributions.
  • Up to 49 days of paid time off per year (26 days of annual leave, 13 days of sick leave and 10 federal holidays).
  • Reimbursement for relocation expenses (conditions apply).

VA is also seeking candidates to fill these other senior leadership positions:

Choose VA today

Author

VA Careers

Comments

  1. James tobleck    

    Please replace, the lieing, ineffective Director we vets have to put up with in Battle Creek VA. Him, his 2nd and the the male patient advocate all have personality lied to me concerning emergency dental bills, the forced cancellation of dental surgery. The continued refusal to get a proper OIG investigation of wrongdoing done to my family by past and present employees including sespis blood infection.The childlike phone call from his office staff of an OIG make believe investigation that for me to see the results I’d need a FOIA . One question, how would the OIG know WHAT to investigate without talking to me? Typical of senior mgt. actions like WILKIES nonresponse to my letter this year.

  2. Lisa Rusk    

    I believe whoever is in charge of the VAMC in Las Vegas, NV he/she could do better to serve us Veterans. I’m from Baltimore, MD and it’s a BIG difference between Las Vegas Hospital & VA Hospital in Baltimore. Las Vegas need to look at VAMC in Baltimore to get a better look how a VAMC runs. I’m sooo disappointed every time I go to Las Vegas MC. They have one choice of hand & ankle braces. In Baltimore we had catalogs of different types of braces. Don’t know whoever is in charge can do the job but they need to see how Baltimore does it. I feel that Las Vegas is cheating us on better service. What are they doing with the money that’s allocated to us !!!

  3. Michelle McHenry-Edrington    

    I suffer from chronic PTSD, Depression and high anxiety. I need residential care but I can’t get it because I have to work to pay my bills. I have been homeless in the past and also been confined to the VA hospital for mental health. I have now engaged in an eating disorder to help deal with my anxiety.

    I want to get residential care but I have no options.

Comments are closed.