Hiring Our Heroes helps Veterans, military and mil spouses find jobs

Improve your chances of finding meaningful employment


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Finding a job is a daunting and sometimes difficult task after separating from the military. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes (HOH) is a nationwide initiative to help Veterans, transitioning service members and military spouses find meaningful employment opportunities. Hiring Our Heroes provides a variety of tools such as a resume builder, a corporate fellowship program and a career planning tool, along with several hiring events across the U.S each year.

Career Summits

Career Summits are meant to help Veterans improve their chances of obtaining a job by providing training programs and job fairs around the country.

Resume Engine

The Hiring Our Heroes Resume Engine is a resume building tool used to help civilian employers understand skills learned in the military. Veterans can better explain their skills to potential employers by using this system.

Hiring Our Heroes, a program of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, launched in March 2011 as a nationwide initiative to help veterans, transitioning service members, and military spouses find employment.

Hiring Our Heroes helps Veterans and military personnel translate skills, build resumes and find employment after they leave service.

Vet Roadmap

Hiring Our Heroes provides a guide to help Veterans understand the resources available in their search for a job. Much like the military, the transition process requires a strategic plan, an assessment of resources, and a lot of work. The VET Roadmap breaks the military-to-civilian transition process into three simple actions, helps a Veteran navigate the transition process which is continuous, and identifies best-in-class resources.

Veteran Fellowship Program

The Veteran Fellowship Program is a six week long paid internship with businesses in Maryland, and Washington D.C. Veterans have the opportunity to work and learn valuable skills from these businesses. Additionally, the fellowship program helps Veterans with their resume and interview skills. Veterans are eligible to apply if they have left the military within the last forty-eight months, live in Maryland or Washington D.C., and meet the specified degree and work experience requirements. Here is the link to apply.

The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on part of the VA.


Author: Kaden Kessel is a sophomore at Georgetown University studying International Politics with an emphasis in Security Studies. He is originally from Los Angeles. When he is not studying, he enjoys reading.

Editor: Michaela Yesis

Author

VAntagePoint Contributor

— VAntage Point Contributors provide insight and perspective on a wide range of Veterans issues. If you’d like to contribute a story to VAntage Point, learn how you can submit a guest blog at http://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/how-to-submit-a-guest-post/

Comments

  1. LADASHA COOPER    

    I am a mother of three and an honorably discharged combat veteran. I am also a honorably discharged homeless combat veteran. I contacted everyone within my power and thus far have gotten no where. I need help for my 3 children and I. If there is a way anyone can help me my contact information is Ladasha Cooper. If anyone reads this I have put all my pride away and as a single mom Im asking for help…

  2. Mauricio Gomez    

    I got out right after desert storm (25 years old) and found work on the private sector thanks to an ARMY buddy who got out before me. When I turned 50, I tried to find work through all the VA websites and those jobs didn’t pay what I was getting pay.
    Needless to say I didn’t even apply. And most of them they wanted you to be some kind of expert with degrees and bullshit and paying you crap. I finally found a job on my field of expertise flooding the marketplace with my resume and they are training me, showing me the ropes AND getting pay even more… If you are a young buck you may have a fighting chance. To my old wardogs I say don’t bother. Just my opinion. Try to find something outside their website.

  3. Woodie W Allen    

    No can make me believe that employers don’t look at age. One guy more or less told me I was too old for a Mechanic position @ a new Golf Course, North of Ocean Springs, Ms several years ago.

    I graduated Community College @ 44 years of age with an Electronics Technology Degree. I emailed or Mailed almost 200 applications from ’94 through ’97-’98. In most cases I never received a reply!

    I don’t think the V.A. is any better… I ended-up Self Employed.

    1. warren d wilson    

      i feel the same i am 52 retired USMC got my degree in 2017 and now i cant get a job

  4. J.A.P.    

    I’m simply amazed by how many comments I have read
    regarding “older veterans” trying to find gainful employment.
    I have experienced the same age discrimination in Michigan as well. I went to Veterans Employability Boot Camp to ensure I had an updated resume as well as the right mindset for any interview. Nonetheless every reply I received was subpar or I was over qualified for that position. As the State Instructor(s) said very clearly the companies we associate with give “Special Consideration” to all veterans. Personally I have found that to be “hogwash.” Once a potential company ask you to send a “chronological resume” with dates they are calculating years to compute our age. Once that was done I always received that dreaded email. The advice I received from the instructors was keep trying. Needless to say I have given up. Age Discrimination is very prevalent in Michigan. Nonetheless us “older veterans” continue to struggle with age discrimination. Yet very little is done to make us older veterans find gainful employment.

  5. Michale D. Hall    

    I have a question: what is the level of service disability to get dental work? I saw a email about 2 months ago the said they were trying to lower it and have heard nothing since. Can you help with this??

    1. Kyl Williamson    

      Wrong place for this question.

  6. Karl Bruno    

    The VA has a lot of job openings, but they are for VA employees only, not for the veterans nor their spouses.

  7. Joy Van Clief    

    My name is Joy Van Clief. Looking for something parttime.

  8. Brendt Johnso    

    Veteran Fellowship Program: sounds like a great program too bad there isn’t anything for an older vet or anybody that don’t live in those two areas. I’m glad to hear that we’re willing to help younger vets, that’s good it gives them a chance to grow in a company. I am 52 years old been out of the military since 2006. I was turn down for the vocational rehab because I was told I was too sick or hurt they did not think that I would go through with it or qualify for a job afterwards. I have asked for different kinds of assistance but through one way or another I don’t qualify I guess I’m just in the in between. Thank you

    1. International Research Team    

      Hi Brendt,

      There have got to be some help out there for you, don’t give up. First of all, you are still a young man at 52 years old, and with such a wonderful and positive attitude. I am sure things will change for the best. The most important things are getting plenty of rest, take care of yourself, do the best you can, and try not to worry. Right now, as far as a job, I think you would make a great counselor to help many people make the right choices to improve the quality of life, and also a great writer. Best wishes and THANKS for serving our Country. We are always moving around communities looking for Veterans to assist wherever we can thru various services. Again, we are grateful for all of our Veterans that served our Country. Please don’t give up.

    2. Aaron Underwood    

      Sir Vocational Rehab MUST follow the laws. You are entitled to Vocational Rehab. Don’t let them push you around. My advice is to reapply and do not take no for an answer. Your medical Dr must follow the rules. Keep up with Dr visits. If it’s only going to a community college for something fun. Also you can apply for Student Aid FAFSA. I RECEIVED 8,000 dollars last year for 2 semesters. This is money you don’t have to pay back. FAFSA you can apply on line. 30 minutes. Anyhow, good luck sir. I’m a Vet too Persian Gulf. Peace unto you sir.

  9. Nick Giarelli    

    We have a position open for a biomedical engineer in cleveland ohio please visit our website.

  10. mike coke    

    Too many employers harp about hiring veterans but check what they relly do. Too many just blow smoke. Its the same with age and disability.

  11. Everything is always for the new separating veterans, well that’s admirable, how about the veterans who are having a hard time securing employment in the sector now?    

    Everything is always for the new separating veterans, well that’s admirable, how about the veterans who are having a hard time securing employment in the sector now?

  12. Blaine Stevens    

    I’ve spent time money and post 911 GI Bill on CDL with endorsements, heavy equipment certs, multiple crane operator certs, heating and air degree, EPA certs, and so on. Finding with while employment right out of the school house is very tough. I’ve been looking for two years and deliver pizza instead of any of the above mentioned.

  13. dianne wallace    

    It is good that the military take care of their vets, but what about the widows. We don’t get what our husbands were entitled to and it is hard for us to advance within the department of defense systems, even when we have a degree. My husband did 26 years in the military, passed away and I only got his retirement check. Which took months to get and if it had not been for me having money somewhere else I would have lost house, car and everything. More needs to be done. When you retire, their pay get cut in half and when they die, the spouse gets stuck with bills and a mega job. If we are willing to work, then we should be entitled to the same benefits as the active duty spouse. Our husband served their time too and we did it with them, therefore we should be entitled to the same benefits, instead of getting stuck in the system with dead end jobs and you went back to school to do better since you no longer have no spouse. You don’t make enough to even pay off your student loan debt when it should have been forgiven and school should be free. You have to study and work hard to get your degree, especially when its on the outside. What can we do to improve life for retired decreased veterans wives and families? We don’t have under age children, we raised and took care of them already and should not be forced to raise grandchildren in order to get the benefits that we too deserve.

  14. James Arthur Ryall    

    Hello,
    I am a 73-year-old male veteran and having difficulties finding a job for a few years into the future.
    For over 20 years that has been the case. It seems like no one wants you once over 50 years old.
    Five years ago I took training for a semi-truck driver and drove for five years.
    Now that I moved back to Califonia for the third time I have been unsuccessful at getting paid for working.
    Like everyone knows you can not live on social security only.
    I think I could work for another five years as long as it is not too demanding physically.
    Is there any hope for me any longer???

    1. Michele    

      Hi James, are you also a disabled Vet receiving monthly compensation from the VA?

  15. Dave Emmond    

    My wife is an Energy Consultant that works with Renewable Energy Projects and Investors. Could you help her get work?

  16. Dingle Berry    

    This sounds like real bullsht ..No wonder 22 vets kill themselves..VA and most of the resources don’t give a flying fck.

  17. Gary Mortimer    

    What about some of us military vets who go tout of the service in 1963?
    I have been working all my life, but now find myself out of a part-time job I had for over 20 years in an office.

    So I am looking for more part-time work somewhere. Is this possible?

  18. Dan Coursen    

    So, while I support any endeavor to help our warriors transition to civilian life, I find my faith in Hiring our Heroes shaken. I know the spirit of the exercise was to find jobs for veterans, but I feel like a lot companies advertise that this is what they are doing when they actually don’t want people with military experience or even a backbone. They just want the good press from being associated with HoH.

    This is just my two cents and I sincerely hope others have had a more positive experience with this program.

  19. Dan Coursen    

    So, if you live in any of the other 49 states, oh well, find a job on your own?

    1. Dan Coursen    

      Keep trying to figure out why my initial comments won’t post.

      While, at first glance, this seems like a amazing opportunity, and I am sure most companies actually participate in the spirit in which it was intended, certain companies like Wal*** just like to play games with it. ***’s Club had a HoH event in Killeen, Texas, not far from Fort Hood. I was newly retired from the Army and looking for a job, so I applied. I was informed I needed to do a “personality test” to see if I was a “good fit” for the company. I went in and, in good faith, answered all the questions honestly. They were a series of situational questions where you were required to indicate what action you would take in those circumstances. Having been in the Army for 20 years, we were taught to always solve problems at the lowest level if possible, so that was what I indicated in the test. I failed the test three times before I had an employee, who refused to be named, finally tell me that the correct answers were, regardless of the situation, kick it up to your supervisor. So, basically, they made a big show of hiring former military, but if you had any problem solving abilities or could think for yourself, they didn’t want you. This is consistent with what I have seen from ***’s Club and ***mart employees so I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised. I told them they could find their automaton somewhere else and left.

  20. Energy Savers Inc    

    We are a small weatherization company in WA State who is looking to hire some crew members for our team. Is there a job board we can post our openings to, to see if any Veterans are interested in the positions?

  21. Dan Coursen    

    While, at first glance, this seems like a amazing opportunity, and I am sure most companies actually participate in the spirit in which it was intended, certain companies like Walmart just like to play games with it. Sam’s Club had a HoH event in Killeen, Texas, not far from Fort Hood. I was newly retired from the Army and looking for a job, so I applied. I was informed I needed to do a “personality test” to see if I was a “good fit” for the company. I went in and, in good faith, answered all the questions honestly. They were a series of situational questions where you were required to indicate what action you would take in those circumstances. Having been in the Army for 20 years, we were taught to always solve problems at the lowest level if possible, so that was what I indicated in the test. I failed the test three times before I had an employee, who refused to be named, finally tell me that the correct answers were, regardless of the situation, kick it up to your supervisor. So, basically, they made a big show of hiring former military, but if you had any problem solving abilities or could think for yourself, they didn’t want you. This is consistent with what I have seen from Sam’s Club and Walmart employees so I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised. I told them they could find their automaton somewhere else and left.

    So, while I support any endeavor to help our warriors transition to civilian life, I find my faith in Hiring our Heroes shaken. I know the spirit of the exercise was to find jobs for veterans, but I feel like a lot companies advertise that this is what they are doing when they actually don’t want people with military experience or even a backbone. They just want the good press from being associated with HoH.

    This is just my two cents and I sincerely hope others have had a more positive experience with this program.

  22. Maile Ho-Turner    

    This sounds like it could be a great resource for employers. Is there a job board we can post to?

  23. Leroy Stevens    

    It’s really nice to know that there is so much out there to help the veterans returning to civilian life now a days. I served 8 years active duty and got out in May 1982. I have suffered a lot because I never had any of this kind of help. It’s been hard for me to get work and even harder to keep a job. I have a 50% service connected disabilty and I have problems even getting the VA medical center to see me or refer me to specialists. I have to sit and suffer in pain that is so intense sometimes, that I acutely pass out from it. Now that I am in my 60s, they tell me that I am to old to receive help like the new veterans are getting. Where is the support for the older vets?

  24. isabi    

    Well thats nice for those separating from the military, because generally aside from ex military personnel its hard getting a job anywhere in the world. But i think its a good development for the American Government at least they have the well being of those separating from military at heart. As for me i just calm my sorrows down by listening to Songs from Sabijamz.

    1. Mario Hernan    

      AAaaaaawwwweeeee, Im here playing the worlds smallest violin for you.

  25. Jonathan Siegel    

    Is there a website where Veterans can peruse job opportunities? Is there a website where Contractors can post openings? Thank you

    1. Andre Weathers    

      Checkout http://www.recruitmilitary.com to post your resume,checkout job fairs,search jobs,etc I highly recommend all veterans looking for job opportunities to go to this website.

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