VA releases Customer Experience Cookbook for Federal Agencies

A collection of key ingredients & recipes for embedding customer experience in federal services


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In President Lincoln’s celebrated words, the government exists to serve the public – by the people, for the people. Today, there is a growing movement across federal government to fulfill this vision and mission through customer experience (CX).

Federal agencies are embarking on a deliberate journey to blend and balance the values and virtues of how government operates within its bureaucratic framework and folding in CX as a cornerstone of the business. By making an intentional commitment to CX in government, agencies are achieving measurable results and positive impacts for the people.

In 2015, VA embarked on the mission of adopting and implementing the best CX practices from industry leaders and innovators from both inside and outside VA. This includes the delivery of care, benefits, and memorial services for all Veterans, their families, caregivers and survivors. Guided by the Veterans Experience Office, VA took the lead for the President’s Management Agenda (PMA) Cross-Agency Priority (CAP) Goal on improving customer experience across federal services.

customer experience cookbook

The Customer Experience Cookbook provides a guide to government agencies looking to build customer experience capabilities.

“As part of our leadership role with OMB on the PMA CX CAP Goal over the last few years, we have been fortunate to be able to work with our CX brothers and sisters across federal agencies, who are seeking to build or mature their CX capabilities. Often times, our counterparts have asked us to detail how we got started at VA and how we have been able to establish VA’s first-ever customer experience program through the Veterans Experience Office, producing tangible results for Veterans and their supporters. In reflecting on these conversations, we felt that there was a demand signal to encapsulate all of the levers or “key ingredients” we at VA have utilized over the years to drive this transformational change, noting that they are common across government and usable by any agency. We also have recognized that there is not a “one size fits all” approach to implementing a CX program, as each agency’s culture and its environmental readiness are unique. Thus, the concept of a CX Cookbook – highlighting key, common ingredients along with agency-specific “recipes” that account for adaptations and sequencing to execute – emerged. We hope that CX practitioners across federal agencies will find this guide to be useful to institutionalize CX as a core business discipline in government.”

Barbara C. Morton, deputy chief Veterans Experience officer

Over the past five years, VA’s trust scores – as determined by VA’s Veteran customers – have increased by 24% – showing the tangible impact an intentional investment in CX can produce to benefit the public.

While acknowledging that there are many paths to success, the Customer Experience Cookbook notably has documented agency-specific CX “recipes” from GSA, TSA, FSA, BFTA, and VA, highlighting best practices and different approaches that have yielded success. This Cookbook is humbly presented as an aid for any government organization and CX practitioners that have the desire to become more customer-centric through executing a CX program.

DOWNLOAD THE COOKBOOK

Author

Tim Hudak

  joined the VA in December 2013 and is on the Veterans Experience Office team. Tim, a Chicago-land native enlisted in the Marine Corps straight out of high school. As an intelligence analyst he deployed to Al Anbar province, Iraq with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 363 in 2006 and 2008. After the Marine Corps, Tim used the GI Bill to earn a degree in Intelligence Studies from Mercyhurst University in Erie, Pa., and co-founded the university’s first student Veteran organization. Tim is active in many Veteran organizations.

Comments

  1. Sue Frasier    

    The VA Comp and Pen disability rating system is completely broken and on it’s ass. Furthermore,
    the VA Inspector Generals Office refuses all law enforcement and oversight jurisdiction
    over the VA C&P process, including the Rater workforce that only has a high school education.
    We would thank this publication to NOT serve as Know-Nothing ENABLERS to VA
    right while we are working tirelessly in the Congress for new legislation bills to fix it.
    Deceiving the public is all you are doing here.
    .
    Sue Frasier, Army Signal Corps 1970
    Fort McClellan Toxic Exposure Army Veterans
    National Veterans Activist
    .
    .

    1. SW    

      I agree. The va is very good at deceptive practices and it is not just C&P that’s broken.

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