Zero to Three: free parenting resources

Free resources to help Veteran and military families raising children


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Veteran and military families, you got this! And ZERO TO THREE is right here with you as you ensure your young child thrives. The summer of 2020 is a summer like no other. How will you get through the summer while balancing the need to keep your child’s good health while social distancing? The tools and resources available from ZERO TO THREE just might be your answer. If you’re the parent of a young child or baby, we have lots of ideas, fact sheets, and apps to help as you care for your child.

I think a lot about my friend Katie, a Veteran with two children, 9 months and 3-years old. As a Veteran, she’s never been afraid to take charge and get things done. But with two strong-willed little ones who have their own ideas about what they want to do, it isn’t always easy to stay on task. Her 3-year-old questions everything and is always on the move, never afraid of anything, and is having a hard time being told “No.” Her 9-month-old is just the opposite – very laid back and “go with the flow.” How can two kids be so different?

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Zero to Three has free resources for Veteran and military families raising young children.

Katie has found helpful resources on the ZERO TO THREE website. She learned about how her children each have their own temperament and how that effects their interactions with her and with each other.

Then she discovered information on answering her older son’s questions about the pandemic and ideas for activities as they stay home more.

She also found information just for Veteran parents, including tips for self-care and transitioning from active duty military back into the community.

Katie also downloaded the free app, Babies on the Homefront. The app is filled with information and short videos about parenting military-connected young children, challenging behaviors, activities, and development. It even has an entire section on parental self-care. Her favorite activity is “Say It With Music.”

As you keep up with your own young children, remember to check out ZERO TO THREE’s Parenting Resources. You can find information on most early childhood-related topics, including temper tantrums, biting, and sleep, as well as great tips on early literacy and school readiness.

Partners

ZERO TO THREE has partnered with both the Department of Defense and VA to develop resources just for you, including webinars on caregiving.

At ZERO TO THREE, we know that early connections matter. You are helping your child to grow strong physically, cognitively, and emotionally. You got this! And we are right here with you as you make sure your child thrives!


Julia Yeary, LCSW, ACSW, IMH-E®, is the director of Zero To Three, Military Family Projects.


The sharing of any non-VA information does not constitute an endorsement of products and services on part of the VA.

Author

VAntagePoint Contributor

— VAntage Point Contributors provide insight and perspective on a wide range of Veterans issues. If you’d like to contribute a story to VAntage Point, learn how you can submit a guest blog at http://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/how-to-submit-a-guest-post/

Comments

  1. Catherine Flynn    

    This is absolutely wonderful but what about the veterans who need help with parenting the parent who is USMC retired?

  2. jacqui hernandez    

    live in phx az and my husband and I have adiopted his grandaughter when she was 13 months old. she is now 10. She does not know she is adopted, but has alot of problems. Wont eat any meat, veg. or healthy. All she wants is junk food. She also steals and constintly lies. We are trying to find her help but since the only insurance she has is Champ va we are unable to find it. Both of us are on medicare so we cant put her on our insurance. I am afraid she is headed for more and deeper trouble as her life goes on. Does anyone have any ideas for help?????

    1. Phil Lockit    

      Good Morning Let’s see if I am able to help. Since you have a legal adoption of your granddaughter.
      You should look into getting medicade for her. Most of the Department of Human services can assist you and point you in the right direction.
      You may also contact your local Social Security office (SSA.gov and approach the information about how to apply for medicade. By doing this it will ensure you are on the right tract to getting your Granddaughter the appropriate care she will need.
      Also check with your DHS and see if you can get state assistance and or WIC for her to help with the groceries.
      Here is a hint I have found that works. Junk food is a source that will not go away. So here is what I do. Slowly replace the junk food with kids yogurt or string cheese, fruit, mac and cheese, make eating fun. Applesauce, flavored milk, chocolate or strawberry. Snap Peas are naturally sweet.
      I do hope this has given you some insight. Also check with a nutritionist. There are plenty of answers on the internet as well.

  3. KD    

    Hi! I didn’t see any info about how to actually utilize this offering…sent an email to their marketing.
    Thank you

  4. Shannon Ireland    

    What about parenting teens with anger about missed time during appointments and anger issues?? We need help and I am having trouble coping with PTSD myself and MST, how do I keep my cool with an emotional and angry teen?

    1. James Matlock    

      Shannon,
      I can relate to your question. I have a 23yo, a 22 yo, a 20 yo, an 18 yo, a 17 yo, and a 2 yo. I suffer from TBI PTSD myself and sometimes the older of the kids push the limits of my meds more than the 2 yo.

  5. jerry joe romrell    

    interested in zero to 3. I am a 50 yo Vet living in the philippine’s my son turned 6 mo on June 15th. I suffer from TBI PTSD. my fiance and i are open to any input you can provide. My biggest fear is scareing them with an attack and snapping and saying something i dont mean this whole lockdown in the Philippine’s sucks to be honest. i was low on vallium and became a little distant and quiet so i would not say the wrong thing or snap. And then the Philipino tradition to take care of the family when u can. Her sister and her daughter live here because her husband is a seaman. her Lolo and Lola live here also. Just dealing with stress the best way i know how. Jerry Joe Romrell

    1. Michael Nielsen    

      Keep up the good work brother. Your way ahead of most veterans just by reaching out and asking for help. I can share with you what I did; I got on anti depressants “a lot of trial and error at first,” that helped me with the physical part of always being on guard; I was hearing noises and searching the house, with a weapon, for the enemy. This stopped after I adjusted to the medication. I got with other vets so I could get support from others who understand. I had to stop drinking also because, although it was a temporary fix, it eventually became another problem.
      Hope you have resourses over there. If not, start your own group. We Americans are resilient . . .
      Good luck brother, you are already halfway there, just by asking for help.
      Mike Nielsen
      1st Cav.

  6. Jessica Alyea    

    What about resources for older children?

  7. Ebony Shider    

    Ok I see you are listening to the needs of us female veterans who are mothers. Thanks looking forward to some homeschool support especially since most are doing some form of homeschool these days. Consider partnering. Montessori resources, STEM resources, curriculum discounts, etc.

  8. Roberta Mojarro    

    It’s about time…I went to the VA hoping to find resources and there was NOTHING aimed at parenting skills…or females really. You’d be surprised how many vets have zero parenting skills and no idea how to be a good parent- they’ve never been trained for it. Not JUST women either.

  9. Jeffrey Generelli    

    Where is the content offered on zero to three website? There is nothing indicating a section for veterans.

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