Vietnam Veterans, families honored, thanked through program


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Vietnam Veterans and their families continue to be honored and thanked as part of the ongoing Vietnam War Commemoration.

Any service member who served on active duty, regardless of location, between Nov. 1, 1955, and May 15, 1975, is included in the commemoration, which runs through 2025.

Vietnam Veteran Donald Cook, Jr., receives a certificate and pin from Rep. Rob Wittman during a ceremony Nov. 9, 2019.

Vietnam Veteran Donald Cook, Jr., receives a certificate and pin from Rep. Rob Wittman during a ceremony Nov. 9, 2019.

More than 11,000 commemorative partners conduct events in their local communities throughout the year to recognize Vietnam Veterans and their families. People can learn about events in their local community by visiting https://www.vietnamwar50th.com/events/. Visitors can search for event by name, date, country, zip code and category. The site also allows visitors to search within a 1, 5, 10, 25, 50 or 100 mile distance of a zip code. While Vietnam War Veterans Day is March 29, events run throughout the year.

Vietnam Veterans are eligible to receive a lapel pin during these events. The event website, which is updated each week, offers details on upcoming events. Vietnam Veterans can also receive a lapel pin by visiting the Commemorative Partner Map at https://www.vietnamwar50th.com/partners/partner_map/. Vietnam Veterans should contact a commemorative partner to find out details on the next event or if they have lapel pins on hand to present.

Button to find ceremonies

Objectives

The commemorative partner program will include activities and ceremonies to achieve the following objectives:

  • Thank and honor Veterans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war (POW), or listed as missing in action (MIA), for their service and sacrifice on behalf of the United States; and to thank and honor the families of these Veterans.
  • Highlight the service of the Armed Forces during the Vietnam War and the contributions of Federal agencies and governmental and non-governmental organizations that served with, or in support of, the Armed Forces.
  • Pay tribute to the contributions made on the home front by the people of the United States during the Vietnam War.
  • Highlight the advances in technology, science, and medicine related to military research conducted during the Vietnam War.
  • Recognize the contributions and sacrifices made by the allies of the United States during the Vietnam War.

The 2008 National Defense Authorization Act authorized the Secretary of Defense to conduct a program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War and, “in conducting the commemorative program, the Secretary shall coordinate, support, and facilitate other programs and activities of the Federal Government, State and local governments, and other persons and organizations in commemoration of the Vietnam War.”

To learn more about the program visit their site at https://www.vietnamwar50th.com/ or the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/VietnamWar50th/.

Author

Adam Stump

Adam Stump is a public affairs specialist with VA’s Digital Media Engagement team. He is a retired Air Force Veteran who served 20 years, including two deployments to Afghanistan for detention operations and special operations.

Comments

  1. Adam Stump    

    As a follow up to some of these comments, I wanted to share a little about the ceremony Nov. 9.

    There were about 50 Vietnam Veterans who attended. I can tell you there was a lot of appreciation for these Veterans.

    After the event, my 17-year-old son filmed an interview with Milton “Hank” Farr, which appeared on the VA Facebook and Instagram channels. Mr. Farr served in Vietnam from 1968-1969. During the interview, Mr. Farr said the following about the ceremony:

    “Well, it means quite a bit because as you know this was probably the most unpopular war that we’ve had. A lot of us didn’t really get any recognition for serving our country in something that the country called us to do.”

    These ceremonies are not just about a pin. Many Veterans had spouses attend. A few had children and grandchildren attend. My own son attended. For every Veteran, there was a heartfelt thanks for their service with a round of applause, along with some hooting and hollering. We also all stood and sang our service songs at the end. Many stayed 30 minutes past when the ceremony ended to talk. These ceremonies are about thanking Vietnam Veterans, just as Mr. Farr stated. As a nation, we can never undo the past, but we can do small gestures like this to thank Veterans for their service.

    If you can attend a ceremony, please do so. The Department of Defense runs this program and updates the website as they receive event information. Thanks to this story, there is increased interest in holding these events, especially leading up to Vietnam War Veterans Day March 29. There are many people who want to thank you. There are also other Veterans you may meet and connect with.

    I don’t say these words just as a writer. I’m the son of a Vietnam-era Veteran, nephew of two Vietnam Veterans and a two-time Afghanistan Veteran.

    We truly do appreciate you. Thank you for your service.

  2. Austin Jones    

    As a veteran I understand Vietnam veteran’s frustration with the return angst after the war to a certain extent. That said- when a bureaucratic administration tries to do a service for you, even if it’s not the one you were looking for, dogging on it likely won’t help in getting what you do want.

    It gives any human pause when someone is ungrateful. Ingratitude for the pin leaves a bad taste in their mouth and just continues the cycle. While the offense to the Vietnam Era vets is a greater ingratitude- human nature remains the same. Saying thank you and raising awareness and popularity for events that give thanks to Veterans causes more events and help to circle back around in other ways. Shutting down and disavowing their efforts has the opposite effect historically- which resonates with veterans more than most people I would think.

  3. Vietnam War Commemoration    

    If you are a Vietnam veteran and you would like to receive the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin, please send an email with your mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil. Thank you for your service!

    Respectfully,
    The USA Vietnam War Commemoration

  4. Brian E. Heyman    

    I’m a “Vietnam Era” Veteran as opposed to a “Vietnam Veteran” as I didn’t serve in country. I reserve that valor for those who served in Vietnam, as that has always been the protocol for this war. It is an odd distinction however, as those who served during WW II but were not in the Pacific or European Theatre, are nonetheless referred to as WW II Veterans. The Commission got the eligibility for the recognition of all who served during the Vietnam War right, more work needs to be done on organizing and publicizing the commemorative events. I too requested a Lapel Pin be sent to me, as I couldn’t make an event on Veterans Day near my home. I spent the day with my WW II Veteran father.

  5. Vietnam War Commemoration    

    About the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin:

    The Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin is “a lasting Memento of the Nation’s Thanks” and is given to all living U.S. veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the period of November 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975, regardless of location. The lapel pins are presented in a dignified manner to each Vietnam veteran during public events around the country. However, we understand that it can be difficult to find events in some areas and that traveling long distances to an event is not always an option. In this case we will gladly make an exception and mail a lapel pin to you directly. Please provide a good mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil and we will ship the lapel pin within the next few weeks via USPS.

    Since we are unable to say it in person, on behalf of a grateful nation and the Secretary of Defense, thank you for your service and welcome home!

    Respectfully,

    Events & Operations
    United States of America
    Department of Defense
    Vietnam War Commemoration

    Join the Nation…thank a Vietnam veteran!
    http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
    877-387-9951

  6. Vietnam War Commemoration    

    Good afternoon,

    The Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin is “a lasting memento of the Nation’s Thanks” and is given to all living U.S. veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the period of November 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975, regardless of location. The lapel pins are presented in a dignified manner to each Vietnam veteran during public events around the country. However, we understand that it can be difficult to find events in some areas and that traveling long distances to an event is not always an option. In this case we will gladly make an exception and mail a lapel pin to you directly. Please provide a good mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil and we will ship the lapel pin within the next few weeks via USPS.

    Since we are unable to say it in person, on behalf of a grateful nation and the Secretary of Defense, thank you for your service and welcome home!

    Respectfully,

    Events & Operations
    United States of America
    Department of Defense
    Vietnam War Commemoration

    Join the Nation…thank a Vietnam veteran!
    http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
    877-387-9951

  7. David Orr    

    I served in vietnam with the 1st Cavalry Div. from 1970-1972. I am not surprised to find that the bureaucracy says I must travel somewhere to get the pin. It’s the same bureaucracy that tried to “managed” the war in the first place. It’s taken me several years just to get the VA to agree that I even exist. Only took the NVA a minute or so to figure it out! Go figure!!!

    1. Dale Palecek    

      That’s the dumbest thing I heard. If I read correctly a man who served during the Vietnam era wants to be distinguished as a Vietnam veteran. If I walked through a farm does itmake me a farmer.
      World war 2 veterans served their time. That’s all that says. Doesn’t make anyone less or more. Where they served and what they did is totally different.
      If you want a commemorative item as a Vietnam veteran you should of went to Vietnam. You could have volunteered
      As I had. No one was stopping you.

  8. Gerald G. Dunn    

    I’m a disabled senior citizen living alone, and don’t get out much at all anymore. I’m also a Vietnam Veteran, serving in the U.S. Army between 1965 & 1967, and stationed in Cu Chi & Day Tieng in Vietnam. I’m a life member of Vietnam Veterans of America also. I’m unable to attend formal functions due to my disabilities, and if possible, would appreciate receiving on of the lapel pins via mail. If that’s not possible, I understand. I truly believe that all of us true Vietnam Veterans should be given one.

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Greetings Mr. Dunn and THANK YOU for your service.

      Please send an email with your mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil. Thank you for your service!

      Respectfully,
      The USA Vietnam War Commemoration

  9. Joshua Kulp    

    I’m an OEF/OIF vet, but my father is a Vietnam vet, and I’d love to get him one of those lapel pins. Those two links aren’t exactly self explanatory. My father lives in Jourdanton, Texas. Are there any events near his area (San Antonio)? Thanks.

    1. Adam Stump    

      If you go to the “Find an event” and enter his zip code, you should be able to find one close to him.

      1. Joseph Szewczyk    

        Please send me a list of any benefits that are still available to me as a Vietnam Vet Joseph Szewczyk 1969-1973 US Air Force

  10. Mary C. Foster    

    Dear Sir,
    I serviced in US Army At Walter Reed Medical Center. 1969-70/ ICU/CCU.
    I am Now, a caregiver of my husband who has Frontal-Temporal Lobe Dementia. I can NOT get to any meeting.
    Please is there a form I can submit to receive the Vietnam pin?
    Mary Foster

  11. MICHAEL ANDREW NORRIS    

    So as I read it, if I don’t drive to an Event or attend one – Being a Vietnam Veteran, I won’t get Commemorative Piece. ? Correct ? It will not be mailed to me ?

  12. R.G. lee    

    Mr. Stump, thank you for your service !
    The concept is noteworthy….however,to obtain one is another matter. The requirement to ‘attend’ an event which the site will not give me smacks of the typical bureaucracy associated with veteran affairs. Not being able to pull up an ‘event’ near me speaks of the lack of prior proper planning to prevent poor service to those whom you are trying to serve. Furthermore, having members of congress leap on the band wagon for a photo op is another indication of the bureaucracy.

    Appears others are of the same mind set. Personally, I have learned to move on despite the deplorable treatment encountered after returning and do not need to wade through a host of formalities to obtain a lapel pin. My DD214 says I was in country, other Marines know, family knows, friends know, and most importantly I served and sacrificed with many others and my oath to defend the Constitution of the United States has no expiration date despite public opinion.

    Nuff said…carry on

  13. Connie M Qualey    

    Like many others here, I am also a Vietnam era Vet, and also disabled. My back is broken in 7 places or more and had a heart attack in 2004, for which I was honorably discharged. I initially joined up in 1969 in Oakland, Ca. Even then they threw tomatos snd other garbage at us on our way out after being sworn in. I also served in 72-74 at Beale when things got very scary in Israel! With a few gaps, I then served from 1989 through “9-11” in New York, and what I would call a constant war standing right up until my retirement. Even attended the only recent “ ticket tape” parade in that city after desert storm.
    So now am retired, but still suffering from constant pain and stress-related issues like low thyroid and adrenals, and a tumor on my pituitary gland! I can barely make it to doctor appointments…and my husband has to drive as my peripheral vision is also going due to the tumor. Can you please just send me the pin? Nearly 30 years total service and they can’t afford the miniscule postage to simply mail the pin to
    me?
    Thanks,
    Connie M Qualey, USAF, MSGT- retired

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Thank you for your service!

      Please send us an email to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will gladly mail you the lapel pin. Thank you!

      v/r,
      USA Vietnam War Commemoration

  14. David D    

    Well, only took over ” 50″ years, Now what, You half to go get it? Oh, @ this age we that Served in Combat, are a bit busy in and out of Dr visits. Oh Well.
    This Veterans Day – with all the “Mattress Sales”- we get, I did remember to put ” Conditioner” in my old ” Water Bed” Thanks for the reminder. We are a passing breed, with those who Fought!

  15. JOHN S. ZAMRYCKI    

    I totally agree with the above mentioned comments. The pin should be issued and mailed to every veteran who served during the Vietnam Era Campaign (Not a war?) This would make sure that everyone will recieve a pin.

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Mr. Zamrycki,

      Thank you for your service!

      We agree and will gladly send you the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin. Please send an email to whs.vnwar50@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will send it out immediately. Please allow 3-4 weeks for delivery via USPS. Thank you!

      v/r,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  16. Duane Miles Cook    

    I don’t see a map coverage for Alaska or Hawaii either. AK has a high % of vets in our population. Hey that’s ok, we’re used to that crap. I was injured (TBI) in SE Asia in a country 65-66 we weren’t in and served in VNam 67-68. Finally got disability after 32 years for TBI. VA decided my wife, who is dying of stage 4 cancer. is no longer married to me after 50 years, and hasn’t existed since 2011. Now my benefits are not only reduced, but I owe them 14,000 DOLLARS from 2011! They (VA) don’t return phone calls and even the DAV doesn’t It’s a wonderful twilight scenario for our lives. Lost our house and live in assisted living facility. Please insert your stupid lapel in any convenient orifice. May you suffer as vets of the Vietnam era have. We’ll be gone soon enough and you’ll have to gen up another war so you’ll ahve a new batch to screw over.
    SINCERELY,
    Duane M. Cook

  17. R.L. Given    

    The water problem was in NORT CAROLINA, NOT SOUTH CAROLINA. CAMP LEJEUNE NORTH CAROLINA.

  18. Don Crauswell    

    A pin is nice, however I need the VA to accept the Nat Academy of Science study that finds Bladder Cancer, MGUS and Hypertension. I have already had my Bladder and Prostate removed and there is still more to worry about. The VA shamefully is running around spending Vet money on TV Ads self promoting themselves and ignoring us DYING Vets, Poisoned by our Own government with Agent Orange and now want to ignore us.
    How is this allowed to happen?

    1. Connie M Qualey    

      I can relate. I had a Copper7 IUD put in by AF
      doctors which then perforated my uterus and
      caused Severe Peritonitis! I spent weeks in the hospital and nearly died because after removal, this
      Doctor did NOT put me on antibiotics! Have severe internal scarring and was never even told about the Class-action lawsuit!!!
      Later, a lot of damage from on-base falls ( they never cleared the ice!), and stress-related heart attack. Back broken in at least 7 places. Why can’t they just send out the pins???

    2. John Davidson    

      Cudos to you Don! I believe you are right about the manner in which funds could be better handled. On he one hand, I realize that there needs to be some self recognition and advertizing going on as a means of promoting veterans NEEDS. It took me 3 years to get my brother the disability he suffered during his service in vietnem. While we had to fight and scrap with the VA every inch of the way, there were dollars bleeding out for all kinds of “programs” and self promotion going on. We should really evaluate what activities and prgrams are being funded and then say yes or no as to wether they should see the light od day. Take the lapel pin for vietnam recognition now being floated out there. We (veterans) don’t need little buttons to validate ourselves. I wonder how much somweone is getting for cranking those lapel pins out? My guess is that the whole scheme was drummed up by some company out there riding the money coattails of sincere vets. I could go on!! Hang in there. By the way, Agent Orange screening was part of my brothers battle, and even though they said he was exposed based on their evaluation, they still turned him down at first. It still took 2 more years after that and a lot of paperwork flying back and forth. Good Luck.

  19. Arlene Jeffrey    

    I’ll add my name to the many other messages regarding obtaining a Vietnam Veterans Lapel Pin. It seems like a popular item. Please let us all know how these can be obtained. Better yet, be pro-active and mail each veteran a pin in celebration of surviving a misguided war.

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Good afternoon, Mr. Jeffrey and THANK YOU for your service!

      We agree and will gladly send you the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin. Please send an email to whs.vnwar50@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will send it out immediately. Please allow 3-4 weeks for delivery via USPS. Thank you!
      v/r,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  20. Michael Melvin Cyncoski Jr    

    I would appreciate that you would mail me the lapel pin. Due back problems I cant travel long distance.
    Michael Melvin Cyncoski Jr

    I was in Quang TRi vn 9169.
    Thank You

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Greetings, Mr. Cyncoski and THANK YOU for your service!

      We will gladly send you the Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin. Please send an email to whs.vnwar50@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will send it out immediately. Please allow 3-4 weeks for delivery via USPS. Thank you!

      v/r,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  21. Arthur C Lopez    

    I am a service connected disabled Vietnam veteran. I would like to receive a lapel pln, but I cannot get to the site in Mobile, AL. or Biloxi, MS. I would greatly appreciate this. Thanks!! .

    1. Kenneth Columbus    

      I am a service connected disabled Vietnam veteran. I would like to receive a lapel pln, but I cannot get to the site in Mobile, AL. or Biloxi, MS. I would greatly appreciate this. Thanks
      Kenneth Columbus

    2. Kenneth Columbus    

      I would love to have a Lapel Pin! Could you mail mine to my home; due to Disabilities that hender my ability to attend function and presentations. Kenneth Columbus 1 Nov 1968 to 1972 USAF.

      Kenneth Columbus

  22. William E Sells    

    I would love to have a Lapel Pin! Could you mail mine to my home; due to Disabilities that hender my ability to attend function and presentations. William E Sells USASA 26 June 72- 10 May 1977 US Army Security Agency Thankyou! It will be greatly appreciated!

  23. William A Guilliams    

    Just like most things they make it so darn difficult to find where the events take place. The site was meant for us old farts.

    Why not just mail it folks, or email where we can get one, this can’t be that hard if you really want us to have the pin, please?

    William A Guilliams

  24. Gregory S. Lermond    

    Please send my lapel pin:

    Gregory S. Lermond
    B Battery, 2nd/4th Artillery, Ninth Infantry Division
    Binh Phouc, South Vietnam
    12/31/1968 – 01/20/1970

    Thank you.

  25. Roon Wolford    

    Nothing shows up on your map for South Texas all the way through 2025. As such how would one supposed to receive a lapel pin?

    1. Donald A Elliott    

      Hi Roon,my name is Don Elliott. I live in Harlingen Texas and like you, have not found any events in south Texas. Have you been able to find a partner that will mail a lapel pin to us? I spent two years in Vietnam as a USAF combat vet.

  26. Robert Hackleman    

    So as I read it, if I don’t drive to an Event or attend one – Being a Vietnam Veteran, I won’t get Commemorative Piece. ? Correct ? It will not be mailed to me ?

    wow. Don’t think that is right. oh well, it’s what I get.

    Robert Hackleman.
    Entry date: 09/03/1969.

    1. Robert Hackleman    

      This is Robert Hackleman, and at that can not attend that Meeting, and being a Declared Disabled Veteran, kinda bad I can not get one mailed to me ? Thought I’d deserve one, without having to ask and beg for one.

      Appreciate if you’d re-consider us.

  27. john doe    

    samuel baker if you did’nt serve in vn you don’t have a clue! you didn’t off the plane coming back from vn and people call you names that i wouldn’t even want pass on . so keep shut!

  28. Terry Roe    

    Much like Mike Z. noted above, I had my fair share verbal and physical abuse when in uniform. But unlike many of the respondents, I never served in Viet Nam, although I know (and knew) many who did. Just to be clear, I was a draftee who ended up spending my service in Southern Arizona working in an office. I never considered myself a “Veteran” since the only significant danger I faced was a paper cut. But, I was selected for the post honor guard. We served as honor guard for Veterans’ funerals. Those were, to me, the real “Veterans”. Every Veterans Day I tend to try to avoid those events where Veterans are asked to stand up to be acknowledged. At least, until this year. My grandson’s 2-grade class was going to honor Veterans in the kid’s families. I answered the questions he asked about my service. I went to the program and saw a group of children put on a program far beyond my expectations. For the first time, I understood that my service did mean something and was appreciated. As they say, “from the mouths of babes”…. Maybe, I’ll see if my uniform jacket still fits.

    1. Ms Shoshona Perelman    

      I can relate, Terry. I’m a female Vietnam ERA Veteran who was stationed in Germany. When I’m thanked for my service, I thank folks for acknowledging my service & encourage the thankful citizen to not forget the real veterans, the ones who served in country, fought & possibly paid the ultimate price through injury or death. No matter how hard I try to minimize my Vietnam Era status compared to being a Vietnam Veteran, I’m always reminded by those I’m speaking with that I’m still a vet, a volunteer, who still served her country. I often wear a ball cap that says I’m a Vietnam Era Veteran, yet some folks still assume I’m a Vietnam Veteran and I strive to distinguish between the two designations — I will not steal the valor of those who served in country or at any duty station (ie, ships or other combat ready/supporting assignments) that was part of the war effort.

      Anyway, I’m just so glad to see most Americans are supportive of our vets & active duty military — the behavior of the hippies directed at our troops during & after the war (for many years) was disgusting. I’ve had everyone from little kids to old fogies like me thank me and I just continue to accept will do their thanks & remind them of those who served in/around combat & they all say they they’ll thank them as well.

      My thanks goes out to all who donned a uniform & honorably served in a branch of the US military!

  29. David Clark    

    Your qualifications remind me of some teachers, and others who didn’t care about crediting those who passed the test, but were concerned about the others not being embarrassed. So no “marks”, no individual credits they were only concerned with the “losers” not hurting their self image.

    I was “In County” for one tour, 1967-1968, I Corps, Red Beach, Da Nang. I have suffered from PTSD, but compared to 55,000 of my brothers and sisters who came home in a bag. at least I was alive. .While there was special operators pre-1965, most of us cam after, and for seven years hundreds of thousands cycled through each year.

    To issue a form of accreditation to EVERYONE, no matter where you were. cheapens this badge to a point I’m not really interested. If you were not in country, or some directly supporting those who were you are NOT a Vietnam veteran.

    SWE3 David Clark(MCB-74).

  30. David    

    How do we apply for the Pins.

  31. David Bohn    

    Aloha: There are no events scheduled for Hawaii, how do we get our pin? David Bohn (redacted) Wahiawa, HI 96786-8561! (: Thanks!

  32. Robert Muir    

    Why can’t they mail the pins??Nothing near me.

  33. Henry Michael Knodel    

    I am a service connected disabled Vietnam veteran. I would like to receive a lapel pln, but I cannot get to the site in Mobile, AL. or Biloxi, MS. Can you mail me one at Henry Michael Knodel 21 Hedgestone Ct. Mobile, AL. 36608. I would greatly appreciate this. Thanks!! Gmail address (redacted).

  34. edward o'neill    

    I’d get in touch with Dan Crenshaw about this issue but the SOB in the 22nd CD doesn’t get back to you! I normally have a helluva lot of respect for NAVY SEALS but Crenshaw is just masquerading! He’s a never Trumper POS that doesn’t keep his word! I got in touch with him about an incident involving the Houston VA Hospital and his staff emailed me back thanking me for getting in touch with them and said that he would be in touch with me via e mail regarding my issue, he never did get back to me.

  35. mike radnov    

    Our ship USS A E 16, Mt. Katmai was doused with Agent Orange, 1966, every one got a little

  36. Ronald P. Bielawski    

    I enlister in the Marine Corps right out of High School in 1964. Went to boot-camp and a month later got hurt while in boot-
    camp. damaged my left knee on the obsticale course. they sent me to the hospital and had surgery on my knee, & while
    there I got Spinal Menigets. After all was so-called well again, the Marine Corps said I fought my own battle to stay alive, and
    sent me home with an Honorable Discharge in 1965. Ever since I got out, I have sever pain in now both knees, and can’t get
    help from the service, because they say nothing ever happened. And I’ve got the scare to prove it did, along with my DD-214.
    Only medal I got was a Good-Conduct Medal. and a piece of paper. I’ve been fighting to get some compensation for the past
    53 plus years.

    1. John Jackson III    

      First contact a service organization, don’t give up if the first one fails you, keep at it. I like the Veterans of Foreign Wars but the quality of each organization depends on your location. Second request your “complete”medical record, go to the VA website and under records/benefits fill out the form listings all medical providers related to your period of service. You never know what will show up where in military records. While you are at it request your “complete” military service record. Always request complete records or you will get a summary or imprecise incomplete records. You should seriously consider getting a VA recognized attorney, the VA regional office and other VA offices will provide you with a list. Don’t give up! You are a Marine! I know very well how the VA bureaucracy can beat you down, but most of the people are kind and helpful, you are right in pursuing this matter. Don’t forget to pray, it’s your supporting arms. 1st Lt John B Jackson III, USMC retired.

  37. Ron Brannon    

    I was a 19 year old Marine when I served in Vietnam. While I fought in the jungles my country was embroiled in racial hatred and riots. We didn’t know all of the details, but most black Marines struggled with why we were even here. I am a two time recipient of the Purple Heart and when I returned home, people hated us! Most of us have never recovered from the stigma of the Most unpopular War in American History. So now all of a sudden you want to give us a Pin? No Thank You!!!

  38. Ron Brannon    

    While I served in Vietnam as a 19 year old Marine my country was embroiled in racial hatred and riots. Most of us only got bits and pieces of what was really going on. We were too busy trying to stay alive, but we knew what was happening. All of us just keep fighting to keep each other alive. And when we did return, we got the ultimate betrayal, America hated us! There is nothing you could ever do erase our Pain! Keep Your Pin!!!

  39. Tommy Hawkins    

    I called the closest contact number listed in my area to inquire about obtaining a pin and to see if registration was required. I was informed that basically they were full and that I could come observe. I informed the gentleman that I did my last observing at the end of my third Tonkin Gulf Cruise in 1971 and hung up. Now why in hell would I want to “observe” someone else being presented with a lapel pin. How long do you have to search to find these incompetents? The pins could be mailed, we are not that hard to identify.

  40. Nanci    

    I am sorry for your experience. There were those of us who supported our military 100%. We met many returning Vets. I wish we could have been there to welcome you home properly. May God bless you, Doug, and may you one day forgive all of us for letting you down. Nanci

    1. lawrence a. fuchs    

      thank you nanci. you have seen our plight, but, woefully seem to be all alone, in your recognition. too bad, the rest of America can’t be as Nobel as you have been. thank you

  41. Jim Merrill    

    Served at Anderson AFB, Guam in the early 70’s in support of Vietnam. 2 years ago I developed Prostate Cancer. I hear that due to Agent Orange being in Guam (which the military doesn’t recognize), I was told that I could make a claim for disability concerning prostate cancer. Well I tried 3 times and keep getting denied. Answers please???

    1. Connie M Qualey    

      Jim,
      I was at Anderson in 1975. Was that still true
      by then? Also got “ exposed to God-knows-what when our C-5’s came back from Desert Shield/ Desert Storm. Lord only knows what was on those aircraft as they certainly weren’t washed before coming home!

  42. James D Apessos    

    I volunteered to go to Viet Nam I left a my new bride behind
    When I returned home within a year I developed nefritis
    Eventually I was placed on dialysis and eventually I received a kidney transplant from my brother
    VA does not recognize this as a result of agent orange
    Can anyone help??!???
    James D Apessos
    (redacted)

  43. Wayne Dale Harness    

    The old question, Agent Orange, what gives? I was an infantry soldier 101 Abn Div and deployed to Viet Nam July 1965, slept on the ground in jungle area for four months or more. Whenever I mention the sores and problems on my legs at the VA I get the brush off treatment. I personally know of a helicopter pilot that flew missions in and out but never slept on the ground and receives 100% disability for problems caused by Agent Orange contact. Some naval personal say they are receiving disability also from the Agent orange effects. Marines that were stationed in So Carolina were called to receive 100% disability due to being stationed close to some bad water. What does this country have against Viet Nam Vets?
    After four months service in Viet Nam I was suffering hearing loss and healing from severe burns suffered while on recon. I was evacuated from Viet Nam and being mobile, was sent to 3 different hospitals before getting to Walter Reed. There I was classified as ready to return to service, but not Viet Nam infantry, due to hearing loss approx. 50%. Since then my lungs have given out and now must be on Oxygen part time. After 50 years I went from 10% to 50% disability. Not enough to live on. I had help filing for upgrade by the DAV, and there was an error made as they showed me as single after being married for 36 years and have been trying to get this resolved for the past two years. I am now getting credit for spouse but can’t seem to get back pay resolved. Can’t work due to health and age. Just doesn’t seem fair nor a decent way to honor veterans that in one way have given all. It seems to take forever to get all the scheduled tests to raise disability percentage and the graders act like it’s their money and you are trying to steal it. Very disappointed in this process.

  44. Ronald Nunez    

    I have gotten on the VA website quite a few times to find out when and where Vietnam Veterans events are. WHAT A SCAM! I have tried from the first I heard of the event. Just like the other veterans have noted, the Dept of Veterans Affairs only notifies AFTER the events. Typical, if your only looking to send out propaganda. If your truly looking to honor those brave and honorable men and woman who gave selfishly to our beloved country you would not rest until every last one felt the thanks that they deserve .

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Mr. Nunez,

      Thank you for your service, sir.

      We apologize that you’re having difficulty in finding events in your area. Please send an email to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil and we will be honored to send you the lapel pin. Thank you.

      Respectfully,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  45. Romulo Cabero    

    My house burned down last year and most of my DOD Civilian and US Army awards/certificate were damaged/burned due to the fire. I have a copy of my DD2-14 and please let me know where to get a copy of my Honorable Discharge Certificate. Thank you so much.

  46. DAVID DEVINE    

    I AM SAD TO READ WHEN ANY VETERAN NEEDS HELP AND CAN NOT GET SUCH HELP.
    I SERVICED FROM 1965 TO 1968 IN THE AIR FORCE GUAM / THAILAND

  47. Robert Rllis Autry    

    As a Vietnam veteran the pin should be be sent to us immediately without any restrictions or delays.

  48. Samuel Baker Sr    

    Thank you Adam and all the others for their efforts in offering this pin to Viet Nam Vets. Semper Fi

  49. Mike Zimmerman    

    To all of the veterans that were spit on, shunned, and treated with so much dishonor by a country of ignorant, disrespectful, uninformed, conformist, mindless, Hollywood moron believing jerks, I want you to know that not everyone in the country was as ignorant to believe what they were being told by the TV to believe. A lot of Americans think for themselves and knew you were being jerked around by a crummy Congress. Funny, I don’t remember the hippies spitting on their Congress men and women. It was planned and executed to place the blame on the Marine, Soldier, Sailor, and Airman for the way the war went, not the poor excuse for humans treating you all like puppets. Nope, not THEIR representative!
    A lapel pin? Thanks to all the supporting agencies and governments? This isn’t about honoring the veterans, this is about making people feel better about themselves for the BS they pulled during the war! You want to do something for the veterans? How about recognize their issues!! Gulf War veterans are being given the same BS excuses they give the Vietnam vets, “nope, your cancer isn’t a result of the agent orange or burning oil fields you patrolled in and around.” Here is some motrin, drink lots of water.

    1. Will Holly    

      Well said. Well said. Were service records burned in St. Louis?
      That’s what they said anyway. It took my congressman Issa to find my records. I’ve got them now.
      Now, it’s fighting the VA, altho Choice has been very helpfull.

    2. Danial Corrigan    

      I attended a gathering at the local VFW Post where we were given a pin and a note signed by, of all people, Trump. I found that to be insulting. The multiple time draft dodger writing a note!

  50. William E. Baxley    

    when i came home from Nam i was sick had no idea what was going on i lived 60 miles from Charleston s.c. and still was on active duty was on leave i went to every military clinic in surrounding area of Charleston s.c. was asked the same question what was your last duty station ? when i replied Viet- Nam i was told sorry no Doctors available i passed out in a navy hospital in Charleston . they put me in an isolation unit for 60 days by the way i was Army . THANKS AMERICA for the welcome home. keep your lapel pin!

  51. Barton Riddle    

    I tried to search the map through March 31 2020 and got no results. I guess you have to have top secret clearance to know anything about this event. They should make a announcement about this event and just do away with their search engine.

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Mr. Riddle,

      Thank you for your service.

      We’re sorry to hear that you’re having difficulty finding an event near you. Please send an email to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will gladly send the lapel pin to you. Thank you.

      Respectfully,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  52. Tim M. adams    

    I’ve tried to find any event near me for the lapel pin, can’t find one. Why can’t I go to my local VA center and get one!

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Good afternoon,

      The Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin is “a lasting memento of the Nation’s Thanks” and is given to all living U.S. veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the period of November 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975, regardless of location. Most of the lapel pins are presented in a dignified manner to each Vietnam veteran during public events around the country. However, we understand that it can be difficult to find events in some areas and that traveling long distances to an event is not always an option. In this case we will gladly make an exception and mail a lapel pin to you directly. Please provide a good mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil and we will ship the lapel pin within the next few weeks via USPS.

      Since we are unable to say it in person, on behalf of a grateful nation and the Secretary of Defense, thank you for your service and welcome home!

      Respectfully,

      Events & Operations
      United States of America
      Department of Defense
      Vietnam War Commemoration

      Join the Nation…thank a Vietnam veteran!
      http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
      877-387-9951

  53. Michael Mills    

    War anywhere is good for absolutely nothing. I hope someday our politicians look to our mistakes and learn something. The men and women who fought and died for this country anywhere deserve better judgement by them. Lets all move on and forgive our countrymen who should have known better and made better decisions. God bless this country

  54. dennis shipman    

    My country dishonored me and my service as a decorated helicopter pilot in Vietnam, and now it wants to further cheapen that service with a useless bauble? I feel like a man without a country and certainly without a Commander in Chief! God bless our Constitution; I pray we will live up to it before it’s too late.

  55. BRIAN W COLE    

    What is the truth about those of us who served in Vietnam and Agent Orange? I have been told that we were all
    subjected to the chemical whether we served in the jungles or not. We need to know the real answer, we deserve
    to know.
    I’m glad Vietnam Vets are finally receiving the recognition we deserve. Yes it was an unpopular war but it was a war
    and a lot lives were lost. I for one believed I was serving my country regardless of the discord back home. I volunteered
    to go to Nam leaving a brand new bride at home not knowing if she would ever see her husband ever again.
    Thanks America for trying to erase years of resentment of what we as vets came home to after serving in Vietnam. I salute all my brothers and sisters who serve and served in Vietnam.

    1. Thomas A Bartlett    

      i was stationed at korat royal thai airbase for a year when agent orange was used in and near the U.S. Air force part of that base. i was a crew cheif and worked outside in the open on EB66’s 12 hours a day. i called the agent orange and was told that i was not affected. i knew they were lying.i am now suffering from body wide arthritis, skin cancers and had to have my right knee replaced, and m scheduled for the left knee, short term memory issues too.

  56. Julian Turner    

    I think your program will help a lot of us veterans. Thank you. I’d love a Vietnam Commemtorive Pen please.
    Sincerely,
    Julian Turner
    TDY 8/16/1975 (1972-1975)
    1607 N. Carroll Street Apt. 207
    Dallas, Texas 75204
    (redacted)

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Good afternoon,

      The Vietnam Veteran Lapel Pin is “a lasting memento of the Nation’s Thanks” and is given to all living U.S. veterans who served on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces at any time during the period of November 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975, regardless of location. Most of the lapel pins are presented in a dignified manner to each Vietnam veteran during public events around the country. However, we understand that it can be difficult to find events in some areas and that traveling long distances to an event is not always an option. In this case we will gladly make an exception and mail a lapel pin to you directly.

      Since we are unable to say it in person, on behalf of a grateful nation and the Secretary of Defense, thank you for your service and welcome home!

      Respectfully,

      Events & Operations
      United States of America
      Department of Defense
      Vietnam War Commemoration

      Join the Nation…thank a Vietnam veteran!
      http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
      877-387-9951

  57. RHEUBEN JOHNSON    

    I AM A U.S. NAVY VETERAN RESIDING IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA WHO HAS FOUND THAT I AM AFFLICTED WITH DYSCALCULIA (DIMINISHED MATH SKILLS). I CANNOT SEEM TO GET V.A. VETERAN ADMINISTRATION ASSISTENCE OR UNIVERSIY OF CALIFORNIA MEDICAL CENTER [CHARLES SCHWAB DYSLEXIA CENTER] INTERACTION AS WELL AS KAISER PERMANENTE MEDICAL COLLABORATION. I WOULD BE ABLE TO TRANSIT ANYWHERE IN THE STATE. I AM REACHING OUT TO ALL THE NAVY AND OTHER MILITARY VETS OUT THERE!

  58. Sgt Elbert Dickey    

    After 50 years of fighting with Dept of Awards, My Company Commander is also given the respect for being a Combat solder in recommending me for the Silver Star Award. My sadness is my Mother or step Mun not see it happen. Now, I will not see my President of USA, President Donald Trump will not be allow to sign the second page of the Award. I guess we all will have to live with the facts. In addition the Army board listing of Silver Star will not add my name to their Public listing. Maybe I have a part time Award?
    Thank you
    Sgt. E. Dickey

  59. RICHARD ELMER PRIMROSE    

    Where can I find the place to go to get my Vietnam Pin plus I served closed to three years in Southeast Asia.

    1. Vietnam War Commemoration    

      Mr. Primrose,

      Thank you for your service! Please send an email to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil with your mailing address and we will be happy to send the lapel pin to you on behalf of a grateful nation.

      Respectfully,
      Vietnam War Commemoration

  60. Joan Strong    

    My deceased husband, Captain David Ernest Strong, died from 5 cases of Agent Orange Cancer on Memorial Day, May 30, 2016.
    How could I get a Vietnam Commemorative Medal for him?
    I have tried, unsuccessfully, to get his name on the Vietnam Memorial but my letter was never answered. He was 100 % disabled and died as a result of serving in Vietnam.

    1. Ronald j Kasperek    

      Dear Joan, I am very sorry for you loss. The rules regarding names on the wall are that you had have to die in country.

    2. Jessica Brekke    

      Joan,
      Thank you for your service as the wife of a Vietnam veterans! I was my father’s caretaker, as he was also 100% permanent disabled from the same. I have been wondering if we are able to get this pin on his behalf as well. He passed away 21 years ago.

  61. Tom Currie    

    I just love the fact that VA sent this out in an email two days AFTER the LAST event within a hundred miles of here. And, by the way, “here” is one of the 20 largest cities in the country and with a major military base nearby so it’s not like “100 miles from here” is out in the middle of nowhere. In fact, that LAST event for the next five years was at the military base less than 20 miles from here – would have been great if there had been any word about it. But I checked their silly map and calendar for the entire five years left in this so-called commemoration and there aren’t any more events scheduled anywhere around here.

    1. VWC    

      Mr. Currie,

      Thank you for your service!

      We understand that it can be difficult to find events in some areas and that traveling long distances to an event is not always an option. In this case we will gladly make an exception and mail a lapel pin to you directly. Please provide a good mailing address to whs.vnwar50th@mail.mil and we will ship the lapel pin within the next few weeks via USPS.

      Since we are unable to say it in person, on behalf of a grateful nation and the Secretary of Defense, thank you for your service and welcome home!

      Respectfully,

      Events & Operations
      United States of America
      Department of Defense
      Vietnam War Commemoration

      Join the Nation…thank a Vietnam veteran!
      http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
      877-387-9951

  62. Fitz    

    Can the Air Force guy in the camouflage fatigues walking around the PX with his dog get one of these pins? Cool! No, thanks.

    1. Samuel Baker Sr    

      What, and you think you’re cool? No thanks…S

  63. Doug MacKinlay    

    WOW! In 1969 when I got back from Nam this country hated me for my service & now 50 years later they want to give me a lapel pin! Keep it!

  64. Doug MacKinlay    

    How wonderful! I came back from Vietnam in 1969 to a country that hated me for my service…. now fifty years later they want to give me a lapel pin! Keep it!

    1. Samuel Baker Sr    

      Come on Doug! Shitty war…none are good, but after 50 yrs it’s time to get over it. The country didn’t hate you. Over half the people thought it was wrong, and history proved them right. Was Russia and the Red Chinese evil? We thought so. For the last 17 yrs, we’ve had a much clearer evil to fight, but they come home to the same half support we did; they just don’t get spit at! Go to the VA and talk to a counselor; it can’t hurt…!

      1. DWSmith    

        Samuel Baker Sr, U sir are full of sht to put it bluntly. History didn’t prove anything except that to let civilians run a war is an effort in futility and totally absurd. In answer to your incredibly stupid question of whether “Russia and the Red Chinese where evil?” I doubt you can comprehend the answer as it has been blasting you dead in the face ever since the end of VN. Yes they where and are evil. You’ve obviously been sleeping and living a life of delusional fantasy land. They, China and Russia have nothing but try to bring the world under their Communist rule since I was a child some 75 yrs ago. So please if all you have for these warriors is that they should forgive, forget, clasp arms and sing kum by-a. Please take it somewhere else. These folks need help.

  65. Cynthia Shelton Coker    

    My husband, Darwin H Shelton, was killed in action in Vietnam Sept 1968. He lost his life to preserve our freedoms here at home. He and the many others who gave their all, deserve to be honored and acknowledged. Vietnam veterans were so wrongly treated, no other war in history ever dishonored their military such as they were.

  66. Marie C Henning-Hamilton    

    My husband served in VIETNAM, he was shot 3 times in combat. He has always dedicated his life to helping Veterans. He started Homeless Veterans Fellowship in Ogden, Utah.
    He became a Chaplain in 1988 and dedicated his time to Veterans, prisoners and others needing assistance. Rev. Rodney V Hamilton. I would like to know how to get his name on the Vietnam memorial in Salt Lake City? Please reply, my husband lost his battle with prostate cancer, the doctors believe from Agent Orange. My name is Marie Henning Hamilton, please contact me at
    God bless your day,
    Marie Henning Hamilton

    1. Adam Stump    

      From https://utahstatecapitol.utah.gov/explore/capitol-grounds/vietnam-memorial:

      Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos Veterans Memorial
      This memorial honors veteran soldiers from Utah who served in the Vietnam Conflict. It lists 388 names of men and women who died or went missing in action. The bronze of a soldier was sculpted by Clyde Ross Morgan and the circular wall was created by Mark Davenport. This memorial was dedicated on October 14, 1989.

    2. Michael Morrissey    

      While getting your husbands name on the memorial is one thing, my attention was grabbed by the “prostate cancer, the doctors believe from Agent Orange.”

      I certainly hope he had filed for the disability compensation due him as prostate cancer is presumptively assumed to be an Agent Orange disability. I’m not an expert to say the level of compensation, but the important thing is that he died of a service connected disease which may well not only be due retroactive benefits, but more importantly, there may also be a substantial financial benefit to you as the surviving spouse.

      Please make contact with a Veteran Service Organization such as the DAV – Disabled Veterans chapter nearest you.. Do not wait as time is precious in these matters.

  67. Arnold Cabral    

    Veterans who read this and Spread the my firm belief to another Veterans and Friends email your Senators or Representative contract a new Veteran Benefit Law who is 100 percent service connected needs a Dentist know how to G4 implants for free because they don’t have no place in United States or have a contract with Veteran Administration and if a Disabled Veterans who is 100 percent service connected doesn’t get the G4 implants by a Dentist it would cause really bad Health Problems plus it would cause really bad Gums Disease also it may possibly cause Cancer.

  68. Msabah Rashidi Sange    

    Je suis très content, parce que je me trouve inclus dans la date du 1er novembre 1955.

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