Texas VA employees help raise awareness for fellow Women Veterans

“We Are Not Invisible”


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With more than 180,000 the Lone Star State has the largest population of Women Veterans in the nation; however, according to a Texas Veterans Commission’s website, many Women Veterans, “continue to face significant barriers and challenges in accessing necessary health care and other services, while experiencing a lack of recognition unlike their male counterparts.” In an attempt to help raise more awareness of such challenges and concerns facing Women Veterans, two VA employees from VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System (VCB) were selected to be part of a special photo project.

Laura B. Vela a decision support system program analyst, and VA Voluntary Service Specialist Lilia A. Garcia were among the 30 Texan Women Veterans who were recently featured in the “I Am Not Invisible” photo exhibit at the Texas Capitol building, in Austin. The exhibit was open to the public during the last weekend of March in honor of Women’s History Month.

The exhibit is part of a national campaign that originally developed with the first “I Am Not Invisible” photo project in Oregon, which aims to increase awareness and dialogue about Women Veterans, and open viewers’ eyes to the myriad of contributions, needs and experiences of women who have served in the U.S. armed forces.

Black and white portrait of Army Veteran Laura B. Vela captured by VA photographer Eugene Russell at the VA outpatient clinic in Austin, Texas, on January 10, 2019. Vela was one of two female employees from VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System to help raise awareness about the challenges Women Veterans face by participating in the "I Am Not Invisible" project for Texas. (Screen shot image courtesy of Texas Veterans Commission official website)

 Army Veteran Laura B. Vela is one of two female employees from VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System to help raise awareness about the challenges Women Veterans face by participating in the “I Am Not Invisible” project for Texas.

Vela said the project serves as a testament to the fact that Women Veterans continue to serve their country in many ways long after their military service has ended.

“Too many people often forget or do not realize we women are Veterans too,” said Vela who served as an Army medical lab technician from 2006 to 2010. “We are strong leaders, advocates, nurturers and professionals. I am proud to say I’m a Veteran and I am not invisible.”

The sentiment and importance of the project was equally shared by her fellow VA coworker and friend.

“I felt honored to have been selected from all the participants who submitted their names,” said Retired Gunnery Sgt. Garcia. “It is important that we continue to raise awareness with projects like this one because it helps bring Women Veterans together and reminds them that they are not alone. There are services for us after the military and they should not to be afraid to seek help because like the male Veterans they’ve served alongside with they have earned it too.”

 

Black and white portrait of Marine Corps Veteran Lilia A. Garcia captured by VA photographer Eugene Russell at the VA outpatient clinic in Austin, Texas, on January 10, 2019. Garcia was one of two female employees from VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System to help raise awareness about the challenges Women Veterans face by participating in the "I Am Not Invisible" project for Texas. (Screen shot image courtesy of Texas Veterans Commission official website)

Marine Corps Veteran Lilia A. Garcia is the second female employee from VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System to participate in the “I Am Not Invisible” project for Texas. 

The former gunny and specialist had their photos taken on Jan. 10 of this year at the VA outpatient clinic in Austin.

Both ladies added that this project was a wonderful experience because they were able to meet several females Veterans from different generations, who served in different branches.

“We met ladies who served in World War II, Vietnam, the Gulf War, and more recent conflicts like Iraq and Afghanistan,” said Garcia.  “We got to sit and talk.  We shared experiences and provided information that others may not have been aware of and could benefit from.”

The black and white images were captured by VA photographer Eugene Russell , who has served as the primary photographer for the secretary of the VA during significant events and documented leadership activities for a variety of uses.

Vela and Garcia’s portraits along with the 28 other Women Veterans from Texas can be seen by using the web links below for the Texas Veterans Commission or the photo album created on the Facebook site for the VA’s Center for Women Veterans.

“I’M NOT INVISIBLE” (Texas Veterans Commission)

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Author’s note:  This year’s Women’s History Month is over; however, the Women Veterans of our nation are worthy of recognition all year round. You can continue to honor their service and sacrifices by nominating them to be a Veteran of the Day.

Search, “Nominate Veteran of the Day” using your web browser for more information, or visit

https://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/24415/nominate-a-veteran-for-veteranoftheday/

Veterans do not need to meet any other criteria other than having honorably served their country.

Help us ensure the voices of Women Veterans are heard and their stories are recognized as an integral part of American history.

The Women Veterans of our nation are worthy of recognition. You can continue to honor their service and sacrifices by nominating them to be a Veteran of the Day. Search, “Nominate Veteran of the Day” using your web browser for more information, or visit https://www.blogs.va.gov/VAntage/24415/nominate-a-veteran-for-veteranoftheday/ Veterans do not need to meet any other criteria other than having honorably served their country. (VA info graphic by Luis H. Loza Gutierrez)

The Women Veterans of our nation are worthy of recognition. You can continue to honor their service and sacrifices by nominating them to be a Veteran of the Day. (VA info graphic by Luis H. Loza Gutierrez)

 

 

Author

Luis Loza Gutierrez

Luis H. Loza Gutierrez joined the Department of Veterans Affairs in October of 2017 and serves as a public affairs specialist for VA Texas Valley Coastal Bend Health Care System more commonly referred to as VCB.

In addition to winning multiple awards as a writer, editor, photographer, illustrator and graphic artist during his more than 10 years in the U.S. Air Force as a public affairs specialist and photojournalist, L.G. (as he was called by his fellow Airmen) also served as a member for the Grand Forks Air Force Base Honor Guard in North Dakota.

He volunteered to deploy out of cycle twice in a period of less than 18 months, the second of which included a six-month tour as a member of the public affairs team at United States Force-Iraq headquarters at Camp Victory in Baghdad.

The former non-commissioned officer returned home to the Rio Grande Valley in deep South Texas in November of 2015, and feels enthusiastic and honored to continue to serve his fellow brothers- and sisters-in-arms as a member of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs.

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