ICYMI: #WhyWeQuit Twitter chat explores the benefits of living smoke-free


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On Nov. 16, VA hosted a Twitter chat with leading experts on the benefits of smoke-free living, representing the American Psychological Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s COPD Learn More Breathe Better Program, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Smokefree.gov, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Tobacco Products. Participants also shared tips and resources to help people quit for good.

Here’s a summary of the discussion, covering a wide range of topics and valuable resources from VA and our partners for people who want to quit.

Click here to read the full #WhyWeQuit chat on Twitter.

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit sceren capture

IMAGE: #WhyWeQuit screen capture

 

 

 

Author

Gary Hicks

  is a public affairs specialist and serves as the senior writer in the Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs. He is a former managing editor of a daily newspaper and served in both the Army and Air Force prior to joining VA in 2006. Gary’s wife is an Air Force Senior NCO stationed at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland.

Comments

  1. Bob Hird    

    Didn’t smoke until I got back from Nam. And by time I got out I was up to 3 packs a day. Before I knew it I was at 3 a day and a case of beer. Things sure went down hill after that, M y dad was a smoker and he ended up on a COPD machine. I said that when I started getting bad I’d quit. Then one day I was at the VA clinic and I was having a bad time breathing and received a breathing treatment and was informed I had to go to the hospital. Didn’t stop in time. I’m a non-smoker now, but I’m also a patient that uses a concentrator and a COPD machine every night and it getting worse.
    Can’t go any where cause I hate dragging the tank around and having people wait till I catch my breath or go some where and have a attack
    Do you and your family a favor, STOP. Believe me you will.

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