#VeteranOfTheDay John William Baber


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Today’s #VeteranOfTheDay is Army Veteran John William Baber. John served during World War II from 1941 to 1945.

In an interview with the Veteran’s History Project, John describes how he was a photographer in Chicago when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps July 1941. John was deployed to the Eastern Front where he participated as a pilot in the campaign to bomb German factories to end their capability of waging war.

On Feb. 21, 1944, a German fighter plane shot down John’s plane during his mission. John and his crew jumped out of the plane and landed in Holland, where he was taken as a prisoner of war in Frankfurt. He was later transferred to a camp in Barth where he resided for more than 15 months. During this time, John witnessed multiple escape attempts.

On Liberation Day, German soldiers fled the camp. John used his experience as a photographer to capture photos depicting life at camp. One week after Liberation Day, John was evacuated.

After the war, John went to the American Television Institute to work as part of the engineering staff for Pioneer Electric. John passed away in 2012 at the age of 92 and is survived by two children and his wife, whom he married a day before deployment.

We honor your service, John.


Nominate a Veteran for #VeteranOfTheDay

Do you want to light up the face of a special Veteran? Have you been wondering how to tell your Veteran they are special to you? You’re in luck! VA’s #VeteranOfTheDay social media feature is an opportunity to highlight your Veteran and his/her service.

It’s easy to nominate a Veteran. All it takes is an email to newmedia@va.gov with as much information as you can put together, along with some good photos. Visit our blog post about nominating to learn how to create the best submission.


Veterans History Project

This #VeteranOfTheDay profile was created with interviews submitted to the Veterans History Project. The project collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war Veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Find out more at http://www.loc.gov/vets/.


Graphic By Kierra Willis: Kierra Willis is a Graphic Communication Major at the University of Maryland University College. She currently has an AAS in Graphic Design and Visual Communications.

Author

Adam Druckman

Adam Druckman is a junior at Middlebury College studying Political Science. Adam is a writing and social media intern for the United States Department of Veteran’s Affairs

Comments

  1. Jack Billington    

    Millions perished so that people realized that war does not take place in modern society. But nevertheless conflicts continue – the Middle East, Ukraine and so on. John fought not just against other people for survival, but for the freedom of mankind from war. It is a pity that the actions of the heroes are forgotten.

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