MyVA Advisory Committee meets to discuss the progress on MyVA goals


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The MyVA Advisory Committee held a meeting on Feb. 1 – 2 to discuss Secretary McDonald’s MyVA initiative to rebuild trust with Veterans, improve service delivery to Veterans and long-term excellence and reform of the VA.

“MyVA puts Veterans in control of how, when and where they wish to be served. It is a catalyst to make VA a world-class service provider—a framework for modernizing VA’s culture, processes and capabilities to put the needs, expectations and interests of Veterans and their families first,” the Secretary said during a recent hearing with the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee summarizing his vision of MyVA.

MyVATransformation

At the meeting, the committee discussed the progress of the work in the five key MyVA work streams and set goals to accomplish in 2016, which includes improving access and seamless care for Veterans, allowing Veterans to get medical care from any VA medical center  in addition to their primary facility and same day appointments for primary care

VA will also continue to work to combat Veteran homelessness through housing and by preventing homelessness for an additional 100,000 Veterans and their family members before they become homeless.

The committee meeting ended with an open discussion, soliciting feedback from the public on how VA can accomplish its goals.

 

Author

Melissa Heintz

Melissa Heintz joined the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2015 and currently works as the National Veterans Day Coordinator, National Veterans Outreach. She grew up on an Army base in Japan before her family relocated to Hawaii. She holds a degree in Journalism/Mass Communications and Spanish from Seattle University. Melissa has served as a public affairs specialist with Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In December 2015, Melissa commissioned in the Air National Guard where she serves as a public affairs officer with the 113th Wing, D.C. Air National Guard.

Comments

  1. Reginald Thomas    

    To address core values and how to make the vets’ experience an “I care experience” the VA must correct the dilemma of getting the fox out of the hen house. Not only by separating their control over the medical care providers and treatment matters but to include stepping up the transparence in all departments and administrative functions.
    About 2 years ago the VA stop issuing payments for travel reimbursement the day the veteran traveled. Since then they have been unable to process payments within a reasonable time period (4 to 8 weeks), which does not baffle me because before they stopped paying travel the day of travel I experienced an episode were I had to wait 6 months before I received travel reimbursement once when my treatment went past business hours.
    This jerking the stick attitude in the department of travel reimbursement is symbolic of many of the VAs’ employees/staff. If a true “I care experience” is wanted, then show us a work study that demonstrates it taking 4 to 8 weeks for the travel reimbursement department to process it claims; give us a clear time line, i.e. critical path, for our claims for benefits and appeals. Make our experience totally transparent so that we can understand the process and know all the ins and outs involved if an I care experience is truly desired.

  2. Victor Ruin Jr    

    A couple years ago I went to the West Los Angeles veterans Hospital and they told me I had lung cancer I said no way and requested a biopsy and told the Doctor that if the text was positive for cancer then do what she had to do, if not leave it the he’ll alone
    When I woke up I was in extreme pain with tubed in my chest. The Doc walked up and said “Good Luck, No Cancer” I’m like WTF!? Her reply?? She couldn’t get to the spot to take a sample so she just cut out the upper lobe. Now they say I can’t catch my breath because I’m just ” Fat and out of shape” !!! F@#& the VA medical care.They ‘really not doing nothing for me now.

  3. William Dyson    

    I would like to see these core values adressed. Going forward too experience the I CARE. Vets have honored their contracts,obligations that has earned the care which is sought-after.

  4. William Dyson    

    I would like to see these core values addressed in earnest. Going forward too experience the I CARE, instead of radical marginal cost cutting care with attitude , after Vets have honored their contracts, obligations that has earned the care sought-after…

  5. Clarence E. Orr,Jr.    

    “moderation” ie CENSORED!

  6. Clarence E. Orr,Jr.    

    Tried to get an appointment to see a dermatologist…waiting time? ONE AND A HALF YEARS! AHHH YES another VA “best healthcare system in the world” comment (propaganda). So it has looked like my legs have been rotting off since 1966 but from “nothing definite” the VA sings. Hey troops ,listen up! there are over 40 , yes FORTY different types of Jungle Rot you could have been infected with in Nam. The truth is that most of it is incurable…make ya feel kind of warm and fuzzy doesn’t it.

  7. Raymond Melninkaitis    

    These are the core values the DVA aspires too. I for one hope they will attain these goals in the near future. This kind of thing often gets lost in the shuffle and people need to be reminded of. You can’t go wrong getting back to basics.

    § 0.601 Core Values.
    VA’s Core Values define VA employees. They describe the organization’s culture and character, and serve as the foundation for the way VA employees should interact with each other, as well as with people outside the organization. They also serve as a common bond between all employees regardless of their grade, specialty area, or location. These Core Values are Integrity, Commitment, Advocacy, Respect, and Excellence. Together, the first letters of the Core Values spell “I CARE,” and VA employees should adopt this motto and these Core Values in their day-to-day operations.
    (a) Integrity. VA employees will act with high moral principle, adhere to the highest professional standards, and maintain the trust and confidence of all with whom they engage.
    (b) Commitment. VA employees will work diligently to serve veterans and other beneficiaries, be driven by an earnest belief in VA’s mission, and fulfill their individual responsibilities and organizational responsibilities.
    (c) Advocacy. VA employees will be truly veteran-centric by identifying, fully considering, and appropriately advancing the interests of veterans and other beneficiaries.
    (d) Respect. VA employees will treat all those they serve and with whom they work with dignity and respect, and they will show respect to earn it.
    (e) Excellence. VA employees will strive for the highest quality and continuous improvement, and be thoughtful and decisive in leadership, accountable for their actions, willing to admit mistakes, and rigorous in correcting them.

  8. robert johnson    

    as a veteran they still dont get afordable help…

  9. Larry Leonard    

    I think when you ask your primary care physician that you need an appointment at a certain clinic he should let you know
    how long it will take to get an appointment.i have waited as high as 2 months to get in to see a M.D. at the pain
    clinic at VAMC MT HOME TN with post shingles pain. I ask for an appiointment at the eye clinic over 1 month ago and
    have not heard from the clinic yet.MUCH MORE HAS TO BE DONE and done now.

Comments are closed.