Intel Report, November 19

There’s a lot going and you might not catch all the news each day that’s important to you. So we thought an intelligence dump would be a good way to wrap-up the news of the week. If you find this helpful, we’ll likely continue posting it each week.

Tough economy hurts veterans looking for work (NPR) For Veterans Day last week, VA Secretary Eric Shinseki spoke with NPR’s Morning Edition about the tough economic environment Veterans face when they leave the military.

Wounded veterans to duel on diamond with local cops, firefighters (Miami Herald) The Wounded Warrior Softball Team, profiled by VAntage Point in September, continues its national play.

VA touts research department’s newest efforts (Stars and Stripes) Among VA’s 2,100 research projects: A prosthetic arm controlled by thoughts.

VA reveals plans for additional 1,000 units to fight homelessness (Citybiz) VA announced 1,000 residential units at medical centers for homeless Veterans across the country. The news comes on the heels of an announcement made last week, which called for 3,000 units at 25 medical centers nationwide.

Passage of vet jobs bill doesn’t mean immediate changes (Stars and Stripes) “The House overwhelmingly passed legislation Wednesday offering a host of new job training programs for veterans and offering employers up to $9,600 for hiring them. But it could take months before Veterans see any benefits.”

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8 Comments to “Intel Report, November 19”

  1. Rick LeBlanc says:

    I like it. Please keep this going. Thanks for all you do to support us!!

  2. Dennis Bray says:

    This is awsome. I am one among many proably who do not have the time to read all the great news,

    My Vote to Continue.

    PS: they are all great newsletters

  3. Nlck says:

    My 2 cents: When I ETS’D IN 1973 DID NOT apply fpr VA assistance for my chronic Neck pain or injured knee. Although, entitled didn’t want to bogg the system or be labled as disabled. I was too young, 21yo. Rejoined 9 months later, retired 18 yrs later. Drove on, stayed away from drugs learn to not be a drunk and rewarded with a profession and rank. Now with Diabetes, Neck Back, knee pain and elevated Blood Pressure. On retirement it took more than 10 yrs before asking VA for assistance. Back neck knee diabetes and Hypertension not allowed as service connected. Local VA clinic will address ills as non/SC, when I ASK but still avoiding bogging up system. After 9/11 return to service as DACivilian and treated TBIs. Most don’t even get recognized or treatment until 12 to 15 months post injury. Complicated by self change, loss of support and understanding from family and chain of command leaders both unit and squad levels. The soldiers as My generation was expected to self awareness, diagnosis and treatment. Medical aND BEHAVIORAL hEALTH has just barely realize how TBI and PTSD complicates eACH RECOVERY. The individual turns to his buddies, or self avoidance and wrongly influenced by The STIGMA. My era it was the Drug scene or Alcohol. Today it stupidity and meth or coke. Once positive Everyone turns their back to you, especially COC and Leadership. JAG recommends speedy discharge, Chapter 10 , thus resulting in VA deniel of care. This is Wrong. The CIC asked our young to give up the life and future and than abandons those in most need of understanding, support and assistance for recovery from PTSD and TBI. I hope others agree and comment.

  4. GENE says:

    I find this article very helpful. Please keep it coming. Thanks.

  5. R Jackson says:

    I agree that more veterans need to have jobs, take some of the jobs that people in positions of influence (e.g HR, supervisors, etc.) have given to their own friends and family members with no education, experience, etc. A vet can have that job!!! I was never in the military, but many people in my family were, when I applied for my job here I was working at a day care center making minimum wage, had to take a federal test (and interview) but I also very much appreciate my fellow co-workers who are vets. Recently, I had the experience of receiving care here and being treated by some due to a workplace illness/injury (They were awesome!!!!) Everyone was SO nice and all were competent, professionals. They deserve all of their pay and then some!!!! Thanks again!!!!

  6. Jon says:

    Thanks for this, Alex. Too many vets don’t pay attention until something affects them personally, so this is an awesome way of staying up to date. And it’s good to know there are some VA employees who recognize that the VA hasn’t always been the most accomodating/ transparent agency Any possibility of having an email subscription list to have this sent directly to me?